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Top Recruitment Advertising Mistakes

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Recruitment Advertising is not an easy task. It involves a lot of time, planning, strategy and budget ofcourse. It is an important element of recruitment strategy. If you're not accurate in this area then, there are chances you would end up hiring or placing the wrong candidate.

If you have not advertised the role correctly, you are most likely to attract irrelevant candidates. By implementing a few simple techniques, your job advertising process can become simpler, cost effective and would eventually help you source the right candidate.

 

 

Here are some of the TOP recruitment errors / mistakes Recruiters make:

1. Unclear Advert - Lack of information

It sounds silly, but this is one of the most fundamental mistakes a hiring manager or recruitment consultant can make when it comes to recruitment advertising for specific roles in a company. It is very easy to be too relaxed and advertise a job role without detailed information. Without the exact job specifics and remuneration package, you may end up with thousands of applicants who are not up to the job. This can be disastrous and will cost time, money and resources.

2. Expecting super-hero candidates

No two people are the same and this goes for candidates. All too often, hiring managers expect to employ a replica of the person who has left. When somebody has been in a position for years, they often take on extra responsibility outside of the job specific. When advertising the position, putting too many responsibilities can actually deter people from applying. This may result in a poorer pool of applicants. The best way to avoid this is to pick the most important aspects of the role and concentrate on this in your advert. Being more specific will result in a higher quantity and quality of candidates overall.

3. Not using repel and attract principles

Basic copywriting principles always teach the repel and attract principle. In other words your advert should attract the people you want and repel the ones you don’t. This can happen in a straightforward way. The classic statement the centres around who this job is for and who this job is not for will definitely cut down on the applications you receive. Within the legal framework you need to make sure you are not discriminatory. However pointing out that experience in delivering XY or Z activity is more than acceptable. The words and phrases you use will also help people identify themselves with the role or not. So make sure that these are also included in what you say.

Advertising within the recruitment sector can literally cost thousands of pounds and yet can also deliver a significant return on investment. It is vital that time, planning and support forms the process. Firstly, take a look around and look through employee records to see if the perfect candidate is closer that you think. If not and it is necessary to spend time and money on recruitment advertising, then take time to write the adverts properly and make sure that they are specific to the role in question. The more accurate detail you can put in the advert, the better. And finally, make sure that you don’t expect somebody to fill another’s boots. Once you do start getting the candidates through the door, make sure you judge them on their own individual merits. If the advertising process is done correctly, the rest should fall into place.

Source: ITCUK

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Steve Smith

Steve has been associated with the UK Contracting industry for over a decade now. He is a sports enthusiast and a die hard Arsenal fan.

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